thegoødthatmadeyou
thegoødthatmadeyou
thegoødthatmadeyou
thegoødthatmadeyou

sheenvelopesthenight:

queensoucouyant:

brooklynrenewhite:

im telling you. new york is LIT literally every single day. sza did an afropunk curated show in brooklyn and she brought out willow smith for a duet

im hurt i wasnt there

^^^ me and you both

sheenvelopesthenight:

queensoucouyant:

brooklynrenewhite:

im telling you. new york is LIT literally every single day. sza did an afropunk curated show in brooklyn and she brought out willow smith for a duet

im hurt i wasnt there

^^^ me and you both

thegoødthatmadeyou
thegoødthatmadeyou

New York Seeks to End Spread of HIV

by: Jasmine Epps
Photo Credit: Michael Appleton, New York Times

New York state aims to end its three-decade HIV crisis by the year 2020, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday as he announced his plan determined to deliver a huge blow to the epidemic by increasing testing, expanding treatment and reducing new infections.

The governor said the state has developed a plan to reduce new HIV diagnosis to 750 by the end of the decade, down from 3,000 cases reported currently and 14,000 cases in 1993.

If New York is successful, it will be the first time the number of people living with this disease will have gone down since its outbreak in 1981.

 "Thirty years ago, New York was the epicenter of the AIDS crisis," Cuomo said. "Today I am proud to announce that we are in a position to be the first state in the nation committed to ending this epidemic."

In New York, of an estimated 154,000 people infected with H.I.V., 22,000 do not know they have it, state officials said. Of the 132,000 who know they have it, 64,000 need treatment to suppress the virus.

The Cuomo administration said $5 million had been dedicated to the plan through Medicaid and the state’s AIDS Institute, and the effort would be a priority in the next budget cycle.

To make H.I.V. drugs more affordable, the Cuomo administration said on Friday that it had secured agreements for bulk discounts from three major pharmaceutical companies — AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Gilead — which account for 70 percent of the H.I.V. market, and is negotiating with others as well.

New York Seeks to End Spread of HIV

by: Jasmine Epps
Photo Credit: Michael Appleton, New York Times

New York state aims to end its three-decade HIV crisis by the year 2020, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday as he announced his plan determined to deliver a huge blow to the epidemic by increasing testing, expanding treatment and reducing new infections.

The governor said the state has developed a plan to reduce new HIV diagnosis to 750 by the end of the decade, down from 3,000 cases reported currently and 14,000 cases in 1993.

If New York is successful, it will be the first time the number of people living with this disease will have gone down since its outbreak in 1981.

 "Thirty years ago, New York was the epicenter of the AIDS crisis," Cuomo said. "Today I am proud to announce that we are in a position to be the first state in the nation committed to ending this epidemic."

In New York, of an estimated 154,000 people infected with H.I.V., 22,000 do not know they have it, state officials said. Of the 132,000 who know they have it, 64,000 need treatment to suppress the virus.

The Cuomo administration said $5 million had been dedicated to the plan through Medicaid and the state’s AIDS Institute, and the effort would be a priority in the next budget cycle.

To make H.I.V. drugs more affordable, the Cuomo administration said on Friday that it had secured agreements for bulk discounts from three major pharmaceutical companies — AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Gilead — which account for 70 percent of the H.I.V. market, and is negotiating with others as well.

thegoødthatmadeyou

needgoodnews:

African Writers Boldly Stepping into International Acclaim

by: Jasmine Epps

Finally getting the recognition they deserve, a new wave of African writers are being internationally praised. Their talents have been brewing the in the shadows of Western and European literature but the new wave of African writers  are opening a world that was for so long misrepresented and under-appreciated. Young Nigerian writer, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie recalls years ago, when attempting to publish her first novel “Purple Hibiscus”, her agent suggested changing the Nigerian setting of the book to an American one. Advice Adichie was not willing to use. It was the publishing world that needed to change, not her work. When it came to unfamiliar culture and unknown writers, especially African, the publishing world turned a blind eye and gave stiff no’s. These days agents wouldn’t give out that kind of advice. Black writers with African roots are making a big impact in western publishing. They are highly numbered on best-seller lists, have high profile reviews and win important awards in both America and Britain. “People used to ask where the African writers were,” said Aminatta Forna, author of “The Hired Man” (2013, set in Croatia). “They were cleaning offices and working as clerks.”  Adichie, 36, author of the acclaimed “Americanah” won the National Book Critic Circle Award in the fiction category is a prominent member of an expanding group of emerging African artists including Dinaw Mengestu, Helen Oyeyemi, NoViolet Bulawayo, Teju Cole, Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor and Taiye Selasi, among others.

needgoodnews:

African Writers Boldly Stepping into International Acclaim

by: Jasmine Epps

Finally getting the recognition they deserve, a new wave of African writers are being internationally praised. Their talents have been brewing the in the shadows of Western and European literature but the new wave of African writers  are opening a world that was for so long misrepresented and under-appreciated. Young Nigerian writer, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie recalls years ago, when attempting to publish her first novel “Purple Hibiscus”, her agent suggested changing the Nigerian setting of the book to an American one. Advice Adichie was not willing to use. It was the publishing world that needed to change, not her work. When it came to unfamiliar culture and unknown writers, especially African, the publishing world turned a blind eye and gave stiff no’s. These days agents wouldn’t give out that kind of advice. Black writers with African roots are making a big impact in western publishing. They are highly numbered on best-seller lists, have high profile reviews and win important awards in both America and Britain. “People used to ask where the African writers were,” said Aminatta Forna, author of “The Hired Man” (2013, set in Croatia). “They were cleaning offices and working as clerks.”  Adichie, 36, author of the acclaimed “Americanah” won the National Book Critic Circle Award in the fiction category is a prominent member of an expanding group of emerging African artists including Dinaw Mengestu, Helen Oyeyemi, NoViolet Bulawayo, Teju Cole, Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor and Taiye Selasi, among others.


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thegoødthatmadeyou

If I were to write a book…

It would be whimsical. Oh, sure, I could write pages of despair, heartbreak, and the like, but what truth would come of the condemning cages of darkness when there is so much light around?

thegoødthatmadeyou
thegoødthatmadeyou
thegoødthatmadeyou
thegoødthatmadeyou
thegoødthatmadeyou

Sem Days

What upsets me about going to a majority white, male, conservative Baptist seminary is the idea that I am carrying the weight of a whole gender and race on my back. I try not to address it but I have different experiences as a black woman that allow me to understand God almost completely opposite than my white male counterparts.

I mentioned before that I’m writing a paper on Black Liberation Theology and I’m learning so much about my race and the advancement of my people. I never quite understood Jesus, and when I finally became a Christian, I never saw God truly in favor of me. I would see whites, who did a lot less than me go a lot further than me , make more money than me and dress a whole lot better than me and honestly I was envious. I didn’t understand why they could “make it” and I couldn’t. I have worked so hard not to be categorized as another black girl but nothing I did worked. I would pray for God to allow me the privilege they had. Also, that I could stop being judged my the color of my skin and for others to stop be surprised at my ability to write well, speak well and hold a meaningful conversation. I prayed for that until I stopped trying to be a white Christian and be true to my history and my experience.

buuuut whatever

thegoødthatmadeyou

soulrevision:

[For more on inspiration, follow me on Instagram: soulrevision , Tumblr: soulrevision , Facebook: soulrevision , Twitter: soulrevision]

It’s not what’s in your wallet, it’s what’s in your heart.

soulrevision:

[For more on inspiration, follow me on Instagram: soulrevision , Tumblr: soulrevision , Facebook: soulrevision , Twitter: soulrevision]

It’s not what’s in your wallet, it’s what’s in your heart.


Source soulrevision
thegoødthatmadeyou